Biomath Learning Center: Modified Supplemental Instruction (mSI) Program Launched

The Center for Inclusive Education was highlighted by President Stanley in Newsday’s Special Sections, Presidents’ Forum, distributed on Sunday, February 8, 2015. Particular attention was given to the $1.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD-MERGE) program, which aims to increase the number of underrepresented scholars completing undergraduate and doctoral degrees in the biomedical sciences.

The release of this article was especially timely because the IMSD-MERGE Biomath Learning Center: Modified Supplemental Instruction (mSI) program launched yesterday, February 12. “The Biomath Learning Center is designed for freshman and sophomore biomedical science majors to receive peer-to-peer tutoring in calculus prerequisite courses,” said Dr. Angel Gonzalez, IMSD-MERGE Program Manager. “The goal is to support their aptitude in these courses so that they can continue on with their degree programs successfully and on-track.” There are currently 40 Calculus A (MAT125) students registered to participate in the mSI program for the duration of the spring semester.

The Biomath Learning Center mSI sessions will be held in the Center for Inclusive Education, 2401 Computer Science Building, on Thursdays and Fridays each week. Undergraduate Student Supplemental Instructor Leaders (peer tutors) received training from the on-campus Academic Success and Tutoring Center and will follow the curriculum set forth by the MAT125 instructors. The four Student Supplemental Instructor Leaders currently assigned to facilitate the mSI program are Wilka Carvalho (senior, physics major), Michael Lam (sophomore, biology major), Robert Maloney (junior, mathematics major) and Kevon Pekchi (senior, biology major).

To participate in the Biomath Learning Center, students must be enrolled in MAT125 during the Spring 2015 semester and have attended one of the information sessions about the mSI program. Registration is now closed, but more details about the mSI program and future opportunities to participate can be found here.

The complete article written by President Stanley for Newsday can be found here.

Faculty Diversity Search Provides Information on Career Opportunities in NYC Independent Schools

On Tuesday, January 13, the Center for Inclusive Education welcomed Cathy Cramer, Executive Director of Interschool/Faculty Diversity Search (FDS), to speak with scholars about career opportunities in the independent schools of New York City. Cathy and her team work to recruit and select outstanding candidates of color and other underrepresented minorities who demonstrate excellence or future promise as independent school educators. Since its inception, approximately 350 teachers have found and accepted positions through the FDS program. Cathy and the FDS team have participated in annual information sessions at the CIE since 2012. To date, they have placed six of our CIE scholars and alumni in faculty and leadership positions.

The FDS information session provided an opportunity for attendees to learn more about the eligibility requirements and aspects of a career in K-12 private education. Cathy emphasized the role research can play in designing curriculum and engaging students. “There is more freedom to involve students in your area of academic speciality,” said Cathy. “Having a master’s degree or PhD affirms your knowledge in the field and will make you quite marketable. Keep in mind that FDS will work closely with you to highlight your transferable skills.”

If you missed the information session, but would like an opportunity to meet with Cathy, you are invited to attend the New York Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS) Job Fair on Saturday, February 21, 2015 from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm at the Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School in New York City. Registration is now open and will close on February 6th at 5:00 pm. More details about this event can be found at http://www.nysais.org. Please let the CIE team know if you register to attend so that we can connect you with Cathy in advance of the event and coordinate your meeting with her onsite.

CIE Program Manager, Karian Wright Selected as Recipient of Caribbean Life News’ “40 under 40″ Award

Karian Wright, CIE Program Manager

Karian Wright, CIE Program Manager

This November, AGEP-T FRAME and IRACDA NY-CAPS Program Manager, Karian Wright, was selected by Caribbean Life News as a recipient of their 2014 “40 under 40″ award. This award celebrates the achievements of professionals born in or with roots in Caribbean nations. 2014 marked the second year of the awards ceremony.

Karian, who was born in Jamaica and currently lives with her family in Massapequa Park, was one of 40 honorees recognized in a ceremony and gala celebration held on November 26th in Dyker Heights, Brooklyn. Karian was recognized for her long history of work with underrepresented postsecondary scholars. For six years prior to her joining the CIE, Karian was an advisor, adjunct faculty member and Assistant Director of Graduate Student Recruitment at Monroe College, where she also completed her MBA in 2011. Karian joined the Center in 2013 as Program Manager of the NSF-funded AGEP-T FRAME project. This past summer, she added management of the NIH- fundedIRACDA NY-CAPS Postdoctoral Scholars Program to her responsibilities. In addition to all she has accomplished in her career, Karian was also recognized for her service and volunteerism with the community as both a reverend and a minister.

When asked by Caribbean Life News to whom she looks up to as a mentor, Karian responded that it was her father. “He is one of the kindest, most affectionate individuals I have ever known. He has always been my biggest supporter and encouraged me to do my best at all times.” Congratulations, Karian! The CIE is proud of all you have done and all you will accomplish in the future!

You can read the entire list and profiles of Caribbean Life News’ “40 under 40” awardees here

First SBU SACNAS Chapter Meeting of the Academic Year on November 6, 2014

Stony Brook's SACNAS Chapter

Stony Brook’s SACNAS Chapter

The Stony Brook Chapter of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics / Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) had their first meeting of the academic year on Thursday, November 6. 16 students attended the meeting to discuss club programming for the academic year. Topics discussed included strategies to reach out undergraduate students interested in research opportunities, potential community service efforts, and cultural celebrations for the coming semester. The next SACNAS event, a Mexican Posada Mixer, will be taking place on December 4.

SACNAS is an organization dedicated to increasing the visibility of scientists from underrepresented and underserved backgrounds. If you would like more information regarding the Stony Brook Chapter of SACNAS, please contact Angel Gonzalez at [email protected]

CIE Presents Writing to Win on Tuesday, September 9, 2014

On Tuesday, September 9th, the CIE, in conjunction with The Graduate School and The SUNY Research Foundation, hosted Writing to Win, a panel to familiarize students with the process of preparing a competitive application for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). The panel was comprised of past and current NSF GRFP Fellows, including Dr. Susan Brennan, Professor in the Department of Psychology, Dr. Cindy Leiton, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anesthesiology, and Stephen Lee, Doctoral Student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

The NSF GRFP supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees. The panel was well attended, with 70 undergraduate and graduate students getting the opportunity to learn about the general application requirements, the panelists personal journeys to becoming NSF GRFP Fellows, and the application review process. If you would like to review the presentation, you can find it here: Writing to Win 2014.

CIE Staff Steps Up to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The CIE Staff Preparing for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The CIE Staff Preparing for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The CIE Staff braved 75 degree weather to step up to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge on the morning of Wednesday, August 20. The CIE was challenged by our very own Toni Sperzel, Program Manager of the Turner and GEM Fellowship Programs. Toni dedicated her participation in the challenge to her grandfather Clem Vicari and family friend William Johnke, who both passed away in 2010 after fighting long battles against ALS.

ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects as many as 30,000 people in the U.S. alone. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has been wildly popular in raising awareness to the disease, resulting in $22.9 million donated to The ALS Association over the last three weeks, compared to $1.9 million they received last year during the same time period. 

Watch the CIE take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The CIE Staff took their soaking in stride, calling out all CIE Scholars and Faculty and the Graduate School Staff to participate in the challenge. For more information on ALS or to find out where you can donate, please visit The ALS Association.

The Aftermath of the The CIE Staff Preparing for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The Aftermath

CIE Faculty Career Week Returns!

Dr. Matthew Lerner addresses the job hunt for Social Sciences faculty positions

Dr. Matthew Lerner addresses the job hunt for Social Sciences faculty positions

This week we are focusing on Essential Elements of the Faculty Job Application.  Today Dr. Matthew Lerner, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in the SBU Psychology Department, was our featured speaker in an event targeting Social Science grad students and PhDs.

He introduced the faculty job search process by talking about the variety of traditional academic jobs, and what ingredients went into the “secret sauce” for entering the job market (hint:  recipe includes networking).

He suggests that RESEARCH STATEMENTS be a 2-4 page “review article of your research program,” that includes a clear and coherent collection of: your project(s) theme, findings, subthemes, and a brief summary of future plans (do not lock yourself in by being too specific).

TEACHING STATEMENTS should be 1-2 pages that include your teaching philosophy with specific examples from your experience, use of creative approaches/technology, “Courses I feel prepared to teach” (be sure you list them using their terminology/course titles), Teaching awards.  Remember that “teaching” includes TA, class, one-to-one, supervision and mentorship.  And convey your enthusiasm!

While not all reviewers will look closely at your teaching statement, they will ask to see your TEACHING PORTFOLIO.  This may be one page with:  Table of classes taught (when, what, to whom/# students, where), evidence of teaching excellence (cherry-pick the best quotes from a few student evals, and give a summary of ratings with benchmarks to compare them to.

Dr. Lerner concluded with a timeline and ideas about how to prepare for your search.  We appreciate his thorough approach, and willingness to answer questions from the participants.  Students, postdocs and staff agreed we learned a lot…

Dr. Lerner and the Essential Elements Participants

Dr. Lerner and the Essential Elements Participants

Creating Paths to Grad School in Science hosted by the Stony Brook Chapter of SACNAS on Monday, April 28

Creating Paths to Grad School in Science event hosted by the Stony Brook Chapter of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics / Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) on Monday, April 28

Creating Paths to Grad School in Science hosted by the Stony Brook Chapter of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics / Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) on Monday, April 28.

Thirty-five attendees participated in the Creating Paths to Grad School in Science event hosted by the Stony Brook Chapter of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics / Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) on Monday, April 28. The event was aimed towards increasing awareness of the mentoring and research opportunities available on campus, to better prepare undergraduate students for science graduate programs. Graduate students made presentations where they each described how their interest in science emerged and their current research areas. The keynote speaker, Dr. David Ferguson (Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion & Distinguished Service Professor and Chair, Department of Technology and Society) talked to students about the importance of making the most out of mentoring opportunities. The event culminated in a networking dinner where undergraduate students had the chance to network with graduate students to discuss issues related to research opportunities, graduate school preparation, and identifying mentors. If you would like more information regarding the Stony Brook Chapter of SACNAS, please contact Chris Martinez at [email protected]

Faculty and students at the networking dinner following the Creating Paths to Grad School in Science event.

Faculty and students at the networking dinner following the Creating Paths to Grad School in Science event.

Community of Student Mentors Trivia Night on Friday, April 25, 2014

Team Ice Cream (consisting of Kevin Hauser, Christian Ruiz, Lyl Tomlinson, and Amber Bonds) deliberating on a trivia question.

Team Ice Cream (consisting of Kevin Hauser, Christian Ruiz, Lyl Tomlinson, and Amber Bonds) deliberating on a trivia question.

The Center for Inclusive Education hosted a Trivia Night for members of the Community of Student Mentors program on Friday, April 25. This event gave students a chance to catch up with each other as they tested their knowledge in a variety of trivia categories, including History, Music, and Sports. In the end, Team Purple, consisting of Benedette Adewale (Doctoral Student in the Department of Chemistry), Coreyn Goddard (Masters Student in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences), and Steve Tsotras (Doctoral Student in the Genetics Program) walked away victorious, each winning prize bag. If you are interested in participating in the Community of Student Mentors and would like more information, please contact Angel Gonzalez.

“Keeping It Real” with Graduate School Senior Staff on April 9, 2014

Lori Carron (Assistant Dean for Finance) and Melissa Jordan (Assistant Dean for Records and Admissions) joined the CIE for a special “Keeping It Real” event on April 9, 2014

Lori Carron (Assistant Dean for Finance) and Melissa Jordan (Assistant Dean for Records and Admissions) joined the CIE for a special “Keeping It Real” event on April 9, 2014

Seventeen attendees representing nine graduate programs joined the Center for Inclusive Education for a special installment of the “Keeping It Real” discussion group series on Wednesday, April 9, 2014. We invited Lori Carron, Assistant Dean for Finance, and Melissa Jordan, Assistant Dean for Records and Admissions, to discuss Graduate School Policies and Procedures. They presented on a range of topics, including registration requirements, dissertation guidelines, and funding opportunities. The discussion was well-received by students, who took this unique opportunity to ask their questions regarding the dissertation process, funding opportunities, and graduation procedures. Students were able to get a behind-the-scenes look at the doctoral hooding, discover the reasons why deadlines are not flexible, and learn about the interactive academic calendar that they can add to their Stony Brook Google Apps account. If you were not able attend the event, you can find the presentation here.

Lori and Melissa joined in on a long-standing CIE tradition - the silly face photo!

Lori and Melissa joined in on a long-standing CIE tradition – the silly face photo!