Quotation Mark, Period, @$#&!

Quotation Mark, Period, @$#&!

In this blog post I’m going to touch on an issue of personal significance to me, so forgive me if it becomes somewhat vehement in tone. It’s subject is the punctuation sequence [“.]! To clarify, the sequence I am referring to is the close-quotation mark (“), followed by the period (.), or, alternatively, by a […]

Victorians Then and Now: Why Victorian Literature Matters to 21st Century Students

Original Strand artwork depicting Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson traveling by train.

When I introduce any Victorian literature to students, I initially ask them to brainstorm words they associate with Victorian, and I write their responses on the blackboard. Overwhelmingly, they see the period and its figures as resoundingly restrained. Though many American college students define the Victorians by their apparently repressed sexuality, troubling gender relations, and […]

Teaching Writing to Students with Learning Disabilities

Teaching Writing to Students with Learning Disabilities

Teaching Writing to Students with Learning Disabilities What is a Learning Disability? A learning disability is when a person has extreme difficulty learning in a typical manner. This can be caused by one factor, or many. People who are learning disabled are clinically diagnosed by a professional, be it a pediatrician or a psychologist, and […]

How to Promote Effective Peer Response

Peer editing can go very wrong.

Peer responding can be constructive Writers can become highly motivated to revise when peer readers with some training and practice respond to larger issues in a draft such as content, organization, tone, emphasis, use of evidence or details, etc.  But to get productive peer response sessions, that is, responses balanced with both earned praise and […]

Ethical Readers and New Media

Ethical Readers and New Media

A New Republic of Letters in the Digital Age In Herman Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street (1853), Melville self-reflexively critiques the life and death of reading.  Melville’s titular character Bartleby’s dead letter-reading and life-writing (or not-writing, because, after all, Bartleby “prefers not to”) criticize national ethics of expression and representation.  The novella can also […]

Teaching Advertising

Teaching Advertising

I’ve taught several classes on WWI literature and culture, and one challenge has often arisen. Most of the literature we now study that takes up the war, whether it be canonical (Wilfred Owen, Ernest Hemingway) or not (Helen Zenna Smith) was written or published in the decades after the war ended. How can students get […]

A Case for Teaching Narratology

Coogan and Braydon

By Dan Irving Much has been made of recent efforts to shift STEM to STEAM, or the inclusion of the arts in an effort to integrate “wonder, critique, inquiry, and innovation” into the typical STEM curriculum. Steven Pearlstein’s article on “the parents who won’t let their children study literature,” published in the Washington Post last […]

Brown Bag Wrap-Up

Brown Bag Wrap-Up

Calling All Brown Baggers For this month’s Brown Bag event, Professor Dunn and several graduate students presented some methods and techniques on how to effectively respond to student writing. Professor Dunn began by identifying some advice for instructors which is also summarized here. Graduate students then offered a variety of suggestions based on current educational research. […]

Article Reviews

Article Reviews

These two screencasts describe the article review assignment that I use in my 300-level classes. It’s keyed to the Reading and Summarizing Secondary Sources handout. This demo is an article review of Mark Rifkin’s essay “Romancing Kinship: A Queer Reading of Indian Education and Zitkala-Sa’s American Indian Stories.” We just read the introductory section in […]

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