#Trumpbookreview and Writing about Literature

#Trumpbookreview and Writing about Literature

by Jessica Hautsch If you were to gather together a group of writing instructors and ask them to list authors whose prose they might use as model texts in the classroom, it is very possible that the last person they would suggest would be Donald J. Trump. In fact, it is probably more likely that […]

A Modest Proposal: Make Room for Amazon; Tear down NYPL, Brick by Brick, Book by Book

Amazon's logo is literally smiling. And you want me to think that having them around would be detrimental? I think not.

by Bernard Krumm Less than two months ago, New York City suffered a major economic setback when Amazon announced that it was pulling out of a plan to set up a second headquarters in Queens, taking 25,000 jobs and an estimated $27 billion in tax revenue with them. While anti-corporate and other local activists celebrated with […]

“Between the Pit of Man’s Fears and the Summit of His Knowledge”: Black Mirror in the Sci-Fi Classroom

“Between the Pit of Man’s Fears and the Summit of His Knowledge”: Black Mirror in the Sci-Fi Classroom

by Meghan Buckley When it comes to effective pedagogy some similar phrases are often thrown around—things like “contextualization,” “instructional conversation,” “tangible course outcomes,” and “reflective exercises,” among others. Very rarely does “watching Netflix” make its way into the discussion. It did this past semester in my EGL 130: “Literature, Science, Technology” class, though. First airing […]

Tips for Transfer Students

Tips for Transfer Students

by Rachel Parker Congratulations future Seawolf! While transferring to a new university can be daunting, you’re not alone in either nerves or excitement. When I transferred to Stony Brook University, I was incredibly anxious. I was pursuing a new course of study, becoming a commuting student for the first time, and transferring over 100 credits […]

Pecha Kucha : The Art of Chit Chat

Pecha Kucha : The Art of Chit Chat

“Tell all the truth but tell it slant.” Emily Dickinson’s circumlocutory anthem  for poetic truth haunted my English course last semester. Using Dickinson’s verse as a frame along with a contemporary reading of Herman Melville’s Bartleby–perhaps best illustrated in this short film by directors Laura Naylor and Kristen Kee–we consistently asked how truth becomes socially constructed […]

Spoken Word Actions and Voices of Resistance Reflections From a Feminist Classroom

Spoken Word Actions and Voices of Resistance Reflections From a Feminist Classroom

by Sean Farnham, Sharon Joyce, Sara Morton, Brianna Rodríguez Flores, and Anonymous WHAT’S A SWA? A Spoken Word Action, or SWA in short, is a decolonial and feminist pedagogical tool adapted from the Spoken Wor(l)d-Art-Performance-As-Activism (SWAPAs) assignments developed by Chicana feminist scholar and educator Chela Sandoval. This assignment combined research, creativity, community-making, and performance and […]

Two Myths–and a Truth–about Writing

Clashing voices.

1) Myth: “Good writing is clear!” Who can argue against clear writing? But clarity involves more than an author creating lucid syntactical patterns. Clarity is also a function of the background knowledge and expectations of readers. “Humpty Dumpty was pushed!” shouts the bumper sticker. But if readers haven’t heard that nursery rhyme or know a […]

Dana Haugh Discusses Her Journey From SBU English Student to SBU Librarian

Dana was invited to Beijing in November 2017 to present her work on Digital Librarianship.

Stony Brook University’s English Department has quite the knack for weaving itself into Dana Haugh’s life. Dana graduated from the English program in 2010, and it was a conversation with a SBU English Professor that inspired her to return to school for her Masters in Library Science after she became dissatisfied with her career in marketing. […]

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