Author: Michael.Hershkowitz@stonybrook.edu (page 1 of 3)

Professor Margarethe Adams Publishes New Book About Postsocialist Music in Kazakhstan

adamsSteppe Dreams: Time, Mediation, and Postsocialist Celebrations in Kazakhstan, Central Eurasia in Context, University of Pittsburgh Press, June 16, 2020.  Amazon link.

Steppe Dreams concerns the political significance of temporality in Kazakhstan, as manifested in public events and performances, and its reverberating effects in the personal lives of Kazakhstanis. Like many holidays in the post-Soviet sphere, public celebrations in Kazakhstan often reflect multiple temporal framings—utopian visions of the future, or romanticized views of the past—which throw light on present-day politics of identity. Adams examines the political, public aspects of temporality and the personal and emotional aspects of these events, providing a view into how time, mighty and unstoppable, is experienced in Kazakhstan.

Reviews
“This book engagingly describes how time and space, sound and belief, celebration and memory are negotiated by contemporary Kazakhstani citizens. It is a beautifully written work of cultural studies that provides both an overview for the novice and new insights for the expert.”—Laura Adams, Harvard University

“In vigorous and accessible language, Steppe Dreams deftly illuminates post-Soviet Kazakhstan’s ubiquitous culture of public festivity, celebration, and pilgrimage as a window into the construction of Kazakhstani nationhood. Margarethe Adams is an insightful ethnographer and graceful writer whose broad knowledge of life in Kazakhstan comes alive on every page.”—Theodore Levin, Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music, Dartmouth College

“Margarethe Adams shows us that the Soviet past is never past, that time lingers in pools of memory, structures, habits, celebrations, the arts and politics. The legacies of a transformative empire endure even in the visions of an alternative future in what seems a precarious and unending pursuit of an elusive happiness. Based on extensive fieldwork in Kazakhstan, Adams explores the nationalizing processes in the independent post-Soviet republic — the revival of Kazakh folk music, the calendar of holidays new and old – as well as the stubborn ideological reminders of the Soviet era. This is a masterwork of thick description of complex cultures in flux that speaks to larger theoretical issues of temporality, memory, and the affective affiliations to nation.”—Ronald Grigor Suny, The University of Michigan

About the Author
Margarethe Adams, assistant professor at Stony Brook University, is an ethnomusicologist specializing in music and popular culture in Central Asia. She has conducted ethnographic research in Kazakhstan, northwest China, and Mongolia, and has published in Collaborative Anthropologies and The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Music and Culture. Her work investigates temporality and politics in postsocialist culture, and her current research examines popular forms of religion and spirituality, including Muslim pilgrimage, religious healing, and Korean evangelical practices in Kazakhstan.

The American Prize Awarded to Recent Graduates

Two recent graduates of Stony Brook University were awarded prizes in The American Prize.

Anna Tsukervanik (DMA, 2019), along with Ming-Jui Liu (DMA, 2020) , won 2nd place in The American Prize in Chamber Music Performance, 2019-20, (college/university division).

https://theamericanprize.blogspot.com/2020/05/winners-chamber-music-performance-2019.html

Founded by Uzbekistan violinist Anna Tsukervanik and Taiwanese guitarist Ming-Jui Liu, Tsukervanik-Liu Duo performs both essential and rarely-performed repertoire including new works from the twenty-first century. Both acclaimed musicians in their own right, Anna worked and performed with such distinguished artists as Ilya Kaler, Lawrence Dutton of the Emerson String Quartet, Mark Jackobs, Yael Weiss, and Ralph Kirshbaum, while Ming-Jui, as a soloist and a chamber musician he was invited to perform in Taiwan, Brazil, China, and the United States. In 2018, Ming-Jui was a festival artist and judge in the 4th Qinling Mountains International Guitar Festival (Shaanxi, China).

 

Ming-Jui Liu (DMA, 2020) won 3rd Place in the The American Prize in Composition—(instrumental chamber music) student division, 2019-20.

https://theamericanprize.blogspot.com/2020/06/winners-composers-instrumental-chamber.html

Besides his performance career as a classical guitarist, Ming-Jui Liu is a prolific arranger and has published several arrangements for solo guitar and chamber music in important publications, including Gendai Guitar magazine in Japan and Taiwan Guitar Society. As a composer, Ming-Jui’s The Magic Hour, Passacaglia: A Song for the Ropewalker, Monologue No. 1: Leaf, Me, and Mirror of the Sunshine have been published by Canadian publishing house Doberman-Yppan. Ming-Jui studied harmony, composition, and arrangement with Wen-Chuan Hu, Howie Kenty, and João Luiz Rezende Lopes. Ming-Jui recently earned his Doctor of Musical Arts at Stony Brook University under the tutelage of guitarist and lutenist Jerry Willard and João Luiz Rezende.

On Friday, May 22 the Music Department held it’s first ever virtual commencement ceremony. Chairperson Perry Goldstein led the ceremony, along with Deborah Heckert, Undergraduate Program Director, and Daniel Weymouth, Graduate Program Director. You can download a copy of the commencement program here.

Congratulations to all of our Winter 2019 and Spring 2020 graduates!

 

Niloufar Nourbakhsh (Ph.D Candidate) Featured in New York Times Article

From left: Anahita Abbasi, Aida Shirazi and Niloufar Nourbakhsh, the founders of the Iranian Female Composers Assocation.

From left: Anahita Abbasi, Aida Shirazi and Niloufar Nourbakhsh, the founders of the Iranian Female Composers Assocation.Credit…From left: Niloufar Shiri; Qmars Kalami; Nosrat Tarighi.

Finally, a Stage for Female Composers From Iran
The founders of the Iranian Female Composers Association focus on programming, commissioning and mentorship.

Read the full article here

BFE Book Prize 2020 awarded to Benjamin Tausig

The British Forum for Ethnomusicology (BFE) recently announced that Dr. Benjamin Tausig, Professor of Ethnomusicology at Stony Brook University, was awarded the 2020 Book Prize.

“We are thrilled to announce that the 2020 BFE Book Prize is awarded to Benjamin Tausig for his 2019 book Bangkok is Ringing: Sound, Protest, and Constraint (New York: OUP). The 2020 Book Prize Panel – Ioannis Tsioulakis (Chair), Britta Sweers and Jonathan Stock – noted that Benjamin’s book “is superbly written—it turns its own pages—and admirably represents the best new writing in ethnomusicology today”. The Commendation for the 2020 competition goes to Angela Impey for her 2018 book Song Walking: Women, Music, and Environmental Justice in an African Borderland (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press). The panel noted that Song Walking is “a beautifully composed book” and stated that it “addresses key issues in today’s world, including women’s rights, environmental access and the inequities of conservation practices and rhetorics.” Huge congratulations to Benjamin and Angela! And many thanks to everyone who submitted, and to our 2020 Book Prize Panel for their hard work in judging the many excellent submissions for our 2020 competition. To read more about both winners and their fantastic monographs, visit the BFE Book Prize page on our website.”

Go “Beyond the Expected” with New Podcast Series

Stony Brook has launched its first-ever official podcast, “Beyond the Expected,” highlighting the expertise, discoveries and service of outstanding members of the Stony Brook University community. Brought to you by the University’s Office of Marketing and Communications, the podcast offers compelling interviews and insightful perspectives from members of the Stony Brook community and beyond.

The 30-minute show features rotating podcast hosts, beginning with inaugural host Interim President Michael A. Bernstein.

“Stony Brook University faculty, staff and students put their heart and soul into their work, which elevates our regional economy and contributes more broadly to areas such as environmental sustainability, healthcare, and social and cultural identity,” Interim President Michael A. Bernstein said. “This podcast will showcase their drive and diversity as we learn about what inspired them when young, and what they’re doing now that helps make Stony Brook the great community partner that it is today.”

Some of the featured guests and topics of discussion:

  • Professor Abhay Deshpande on the evolution of nuclear science and his involvement in planning for the Brookhaven National Lab-awarded development of the Electron Ion Collider.
  • David Fiorella on cutting-edge approaches to interventional brain surgery and new services he has brought to Long Island to help save the lives of stroke victims.
  • Sharon Nachman on the safety of immunizations and vaccines and insights on the 2019-Novel Coronavirus.
  • Carolyn Peabody and second-year MSW student, Meesha Johnson, on the 2020 Census and getting the Native American population in Suffolk County counted.

The inaugural episode features Jazz Artist-In-Residence Thomas Manuel, founding president of The Jazz Loft in Stony Brook Village, who will discuss his work with young jazz musicians and his contributions to the popular community hot spot.

Listen on iTunes

Listen on Spotify

Listen on Google Podcasts

Department of Music Announces New Appointments

The Stony Brook University Department of Music is proud to announce the appointment of two new faculty members: João Luiz Rezende Lopes, guitar and Jeremy Little , opera and voice.

Two time Latin Grammy nominee guitarist, educator, and composer João Luiz, began to play the popular music of his native Brazil professionally during his childhood and was later trained in classical guitar by his mentor Henrique Pinto. Winner of the 2006 Concert Artists Guild Competition as a member of the critically acclaimed Brasil Guitar Duo, João has performed extensively in the United States, Asia, Europe and Latin America. His versatility led him to be chosen to collaborate with Yo-Yo Ma and Carlos Prieto on a project to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Cuban composer Leo Brouwer in a landmark concert in Cuba in 2014. João is also the director of chamber music at CUNY Hunter College and the head of the guitar at SUNY Purchase.

Tenor Jeremy Little has established himself as a versatile performing artist on the United States’ most prestigious opera, concert, and recital stages, as well as a dynamic voice teacher, coach, and mentor to new generations of vocal musicians. Dr. Little has been a principal artist with The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, Wolf Trap Opera, Florentine Opera, Opera Theater of St. Louis, Des Moines Metro Opera, Anchorage Opera, Opera Southwest, and Pensacola Opera.  Following his 2007-08 season as principal artist with The Metropolitan Opera, Mr. Little was offered a coveted position with The Met Opera Chorus. He decided to try it out. Now, eleven seasons later, he has performed in over 1,500 performances at the Met, where he spends every day working alongside the greatest operatic singers, coaches, and conductors in the world. Jeremy continues to learn every day and has earned degrees from Louisiana State University (MM), The Juilliard School (AD), and, while on sabbatical from the Met, Stony Brook University (DMA).

Stony Brook Alumna, Student, Featured in Journal of Network Music and Arts

Sarah Weaver NowNet Arts Festival 2018-Eric Vitale Photography-57.jpg

Dr. Sarah Weaver

The brand new Journal of Network Music and Arts recently published its first issue. Dr. Sarah Weaver (PH.D, 2018) serves as the editor-in-chief. Dr. Weaver describes the new journal in her editorial: “JONMA is a peer-reviewed open access digital research journal published by Stony Brook University. Network Music and Arts utilize the Internet and related technologies as an artistic medium for works created for this platform. JONMA will publish research by artists, technologists, educators, and related scholars. The journal content will include articles, audio and video documentation, and reviews for books and recordings.”

Eric Lemmon, Ph.D. student in Composition, has his article featured entitled “Telematic Music vs. Networked Music: Distinguishing Between Cybernetic Aspirations and Technological Music-Making.”

Dr. Levy Lorenzo (DMA, 2014) Named Assistant Professor of Creative Technologies at Mannes

Richard Kessler, Executive Dean for the College of Performing Arts at The New School announced today that artist-engineer Levy Lorenzo has been appointed Assistant Professor of Creative Technologies for the college. In this role, Lorenzo will develop and teach new programs and curricula across Mannes School of Music, the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music, and the School of Drama. He will also pioneer new performance opportunities that engage student musicians, composers, actors, directors, and other artists across The New School in technology-inflected work.

Artist-Engineer, and new Assistant Professor of Creative Technologies, Levy Lorenzo

“I am overjoyed and humbled to join the forward-thinking community at The New School to establish new learning experiences and opportunities towards the study of creative technological practice.” said Lorenzo. “It is the logical progression in cutting-edge performing arts education to prepare the next generations of graduates to emerge as technology-empowered artists.”

The hiring of Lorenzo as Assistant Professor for Creative Technologies is another step in the further integration of Mannes, Jazz, and Drama, and aims to establish creative technologies as a core part of the curricula for all students at the College of Performing Arts. In this new role, Lorenzo will not only develop and teach new courses but will also lead the advancement of technology-infused creative practice as an area and body of work across the college and the larger New School campus. This will include project development, curation, performance, and most importantly, the development of a comprehensive yet ever-evolving curricular vision where the use of technology is a central component of the learning and development process for performing artists and makers of all kinds.

“It is a true pleasure to welcome Levy to The New School,” said Richard Kessler, Executive Dean for the College of Performing Arts. “I have been a big admirer of Levy’s work for a long time and have been deeply interested in the ways that he expands sound and theatrical worlds through technology and experimentation. We are eager to watch Levy’s work as he brings new forms of expression and performance to our students at Mannes, Jazz, and Drama.”

The early vision for creative technologies at the College of Performing Arts stands apart from the traditional view of technology within a conservatory environment, where its use is often focused towards the areas of digital notation, sound/video recording, and stage production. At the College of Performing Arts, Lorenzo brings a vision and perspective where technology is not a means to an end, but rather an integral component within the makeup of the artistic process. The scope of Creative Technology at the College of Performing Arts will include, in addition to the above areas, creative coding, handmade electronics, instrument design, interactive installation, projection/video design, and other performance-technology platforms.

As a performer/practitioner himself, Levy Lorenzo is no stranger to the integration of technology and performance. Lorenzo, whose work The New York Times described as a “potent force on the side of exuberance, pleasure and awe of virtuosity”, has a body of work that spans custom electronics design, sound engineering, instrument building, installation art, free improvisation, and classical percussion. With a primary focus on inventing new instruments, he prototypes, composes, and plays live electronics. As an electronic art consultant, he designs interactive electronics ranging from small sculptures to large-scale public art installations with artists such as Alvin Lucier, Christine Sun Kim, and Leo Villareal.

As a percussionists/electronics performer, Lorenzo co-founded the experimental theater/electronics duo Radical 2 with Dennis Sullivan and recently released a duo album Q with trumpet virtuoso/improviser Peter Evans. As a sound engineer, he specializes in the realization and performance of complete electro-acoustic concerts with non-traditional configurations. One of his main engineering engagements is Claire Chase’s Density 2036 project. Lorenzo is also a core member of the acclaimed International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), where he fulfills multiple roles as technical director, electronicist, and percussionist.

Lorenzo’s work has been featured at STEIM, Harvestworks, MoMA PS1, MIT Media Lab, Banff Centre, Pitchfork.com, Slashdot.org, Inspirefest, Kellogg, Bose, The New York Times, BBC, and Burning Man. Levy earned his Master of Electrical & Computer Engineering (MEng) from Cornell University, and Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) in Percussion Performance from Stony Brook University. The breadth of Lorenzo’s work can be seen at www.levylorenzo.com

David Bernard, (MM, 1988, Orchestral Conducting), Awarded First Prize in Orchestral Conducting in the American Prize

David Bernard, (MM 1988 Orchestral Conducting), has been awarded First Prize in the Orchestral Conducting competition of The American Prize, professional division 2019, a national competition for conductors. In making their selection from a diverse group of conductors from across the United States, the panel of judges acclaimed:

More information about the 2019 Orchestral Conducting award can be found here: http://bit.ly/2019AmericanPrizeCondWinners“Conducting from memory, David Bernard exhibits remarkable skill and considerable elan in a vibrant reading of Stravinsky ‘Rite of Spring.’ Not content with a cool, furrowed-brow approach to this music, his interpretation is alive to the nuances of color and, indeed, the dramatic arc, of this legendary masterwork. His is a considerable achievement by any standard.”

David Bernard has gained recognition for his dramatic and incisive conducting in the United Stated and in over 20 countries on four continents, serving as Music Director of the Park Avenue Chamber Symphony and the Massapequa Philharmonic, and also as conductor for the Eglevsky Ballet’s critically acclaimed production of The Nutcracker produced each December at Long Island’s Tilles Center of the Performing Arts.  Mr. Bernard is Music Director of InsideOut Concerts, Inc., dedicated to helping orchestras grow their audiences through immersive events where audiences sit inside the orchestra during concerts. His InsideOut Concerts have been acclaimed by WQXR, Newsday, ClassicalWorld and the Epoch Times, bringing an unsurpassed experience and level of engagement for the audiences of all ages. 

As a sought after guest conductor, David Bernard will be making his debut this season with the Dubuque (IA) Symphony, the Greenwich (CT) Symphony and the  Danbury (CT) Symphony and has appeared as a guest conductor with the Brooklyn Symphony, the Greater Newburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Island Symphony Orchestra, the Litha Symphony, Manhattan School of Music, the New York Symphonic Arts Ensemble, the Putnam Symphony and the South Shore Symphony. 

Noted recent performances include a Lincoln Center performance of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (“Conducting from memory, David Bernard led a transcendent performance…vivid…expertly choreographed.”, LucidCulture) and a Carnegie Hall performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony (“taught and dramatic”, superconductor).  David Bernard’s recordings have received enthusiastic critical praise. His release of Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique was lauded by Gramophone Magazine as “…an impressively elegant, thoughtful, well balanced and sophisticated Tchaikovsky Pathétique.” Of his Beethoven Symphony No. 9 release, The Arts Desk proclaimed “Scintillating Beethoven…Edge-of-the-seat playing…it’s a winner: dramatic, witty, eloquent and boasting some startling choral work in the last movement.” His complete recorded Beethoven symphony cycle was praised by Fanfare magazine for its “intensity, spontaneity, propulsive rhythm, textural clarity, dynamic control, and well-judged phrasing”. Of his recent premiere recording of new editions of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring and The Firebird, The Art Music Lounge proclaimed “this is THE preferred recording of The Rite because of its authenticity as well as the almost startling boldness of approach.” 

Founded in 2009, The American Prize produces a series of national competitions, annually recognizing the best artists and ensembles in the performing arts in the United States.  Structured In 4 distinct levels—Professional, Community, University and Youth—The American Prize offers competitions in Conducting, Orchestral/Band/Choral Performance, Orchestral Programming, Composition, Instrumental/Vocal Performance, Chamber Music,  Opera, Musical Theater and Arts Marketing.  Previous winners of The American Prize Orchestral Conducting Competition include Lawrence Golan, Kenneth Kiesler, Dirk Meyer, Jeffrey Meyer, Gemma New, Gary Sheldon, Christopher Zimmerman.

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