Author: Michael.Hershkowitz@stonybrook.edu (page 1 of 2)

David Bernard, (MM, 1988, Orchestral Conducting), Awarded First Prize in Orchestral Conducting in the American Prize

David Bernard, (MM 1988 Orchestral Conducting), has been awarded First Prize in the Orchestral Conducting competition of The American Prize, professional division 2019, a national competition for conductors. In making their selection from a diverse group of conductors from across the United States, the panel of judges acclaimed:

More information about the 2019 Orchestral Conducting award can be found here: http://bit.ly/2019AmericanPrizeCondWinners“Conducting from memory, David Bernard exhibits remarkable skill and considerable elan in a vibrant reading of Stravinsky ‘Rite of Spring.’ Not content with a cool, furrowed-brow approach to this music, his interpretation is alive to the nuances of color and, indeed, the dramatic arc, of this legendary masterwork. His is a considerable achievement by any standard.”

David Bernard has gained recognition for his dramatic and incisive conducting in the United Stated and in over 20 countries on four continents, serving as Music Director of the Park Avenue Chamber Symphony and the Massapequa Philharmonic, and also as conductor for the Eglevsky Ballet’s critically acclaimed production of The Nutcracker produced each December at Long Island’s Tilles Center of the Performing Arts.  Mr. Bernard is Music Director of InsideOut Concerts, Inc., dedicated to helping orchestras grow their audiences through immersive events where audiences sit inside the orchestra during concerts. His InsideOut Concerts have been acclaimed by WQXR, Newsday, ClassicalWorld and the Epoch Times, bringing an unsurpassed experience and level of engagement for the audiences of all ages. 

As a sought after guest conductor, David Bernard will be making his debut this season with the Dubuque (IA) Symphony, the Greenwich (CT) Symphony and the  Danbury (CT) Symphony and has appeared as a guest conductor with the Brooklyn Symphony, the Greater Newburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Island Symphony Orchestra, the Litha Symphony, Manhattan School of Music, the New York Symphonic Arts Ensemble, the Putnam Symphony and the South Shore Symphony. 

Noted recent performances include a Lincoln Center performance of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (“Conducting from memory, David Bernard led a transcendent performance…vivid…expertly choreographed.”, LucidCulture) and a Carnegie Hall performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony (“taught and dramatic”, superconductor).  David Bernard’s recordings have received enthusiastic critical praise. His release of Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique was lauded by Gramophone Magazine as “…an impressively elegant, thoughtful, well balanced and sophisticated Tchaikovsky Pathétique.” Of his Beethoven Symphony No. 9 release, The Arts Desk proclaimed “Scintillating Beethoven…Edge-of-the-seat playing…it’s a winner: dramatic, witty, eloquent and boasting some startling choral work in the last movement.” His complete recorded Beethoven symphony cycle was praised by Fanfare magazine for its “intensity, spontaneity, propulsive rhythm, textural clarity, dynamic control, and well-judged phrasing”. Of his recent premiere recording of new editions of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring and The Firebird, The Art Music Lounge proclaimed “this is THE preferred recording of The Rite because of its authenticity as well as the almost startling boldness of approach.” 

Founded in 2009, The American Prize produces a series of national competitions, annually recognizing the best artists and ensembles in the performing arts in the United States.  Structured In 4 distinct levels—Professional, Community, University and Youth—The American Prize offers competitions in Conducting, Orchestral/Band/Choral Performance, Orchestral Programming, Composition, Instrumental/Vocal Performance, Chamber Music,  Opera, Musical Theater and Arts Marketing.  Previous winners of The American Prize Orchestral Conducting Competition include Lawrence Golan, Kenneth Kiesler, Dirk Meyer, Jeffrey Meyer, Gemma New, Gary Sheldon, Christopher Zimmerman.

DMA Violinist Yezu Woo Receives Fulbright Award

The U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board are pleased to announce that Yezu Woo of State University of New York Stony Brook has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award to Germany in Performing Arts/Violin. Yezu will conduct research at Hochschule für Musik und Darstel- lende Kunst Frankfurt am Main and the Isang Yun Foundation Berlin as part of her project ‘Discovering Isang Yun and his World’. She will spend a year in Frankfurt, as an academy member of Ensemble Modern and in Berlin, working at the foundation dedicated to the Korean-German composer Isang Yun.

Yezu is one of over 2,100 U.S. citizens who will conduct research, teach English, and provide expertise abroad for the 2019-2020 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as their record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields.

Employment Opportunity: Tenure-Track Scholar in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology

Scholar in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology

POSITION TITLE: Assistant Professor of Music (tenure-track)

QUALIFICATIONS: Scholar with an established record of, or demonstrated potential for, scholarly productivity. We have a particular interest in applicants whose research specialties intersect with one or more these areas: new approaches to music before 1600; gender, sexuality, and queer theory; critical race studies; or popular music studies. Candidates should hold a Ph.D, or have advanced ABD status, in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology, and should be well-versed in both historical and theoretical domains. We look for demonstrated achievement in or potential for scholarly productivity, and a record of successful teaching experience.

EMPLOYMENT: Appointment starts late August 2020.

RANK: Assistant Professor (tenure-track). PhD required for appointment as Assistant; ABDs may be considered for lectureship.

DUTIES: Responsibilities will include undergraduate and graduate instruction, supervision of student research and writing, dissertation direction, advising, and departmental and university service.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Review of files begins October 1, 2019, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Applicants should complete the Academic Jobs Online application at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14419. Electronic submission of materials is required. The application requires these materials: cover letter, CV, statement of teaching interests and philosophy, and three letters of recommendation.

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS FROM WOMEN, PEOPLE OF COLOR, DISABLED PERSONS, AND/OR SPECIAL DISABLED OR VIETNAM ERA VETERANS ARE ESPECIALLY WELCOME.

Transforming Advanced Nanoscience Data into Interactive Art

Brookhaven Lab Center for Functional Nanomaterials scientist Kevin Yager, Brooklyn-based multimedia artist Melissa Clarke, and Stony Brook University professor of computer music Margaret Schedel generated novel representations of experimental nanoscience data through 3-D printing, sound, and virtual reality.

Multimedia artist Melissa Clarke (center) made more than a dozen 3-D printed glass-like sculptures based on nanoscience data collected by scientists at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) and National Synchrotron Light Source II, including CFN physicist Kevin Yager (right). For the virtual reality (VR) component of the project, viewers can walk through and interact with the sculptures by wearing a VR headset. During the immersive experience, different sonifications created by Margaret Schedel (left)—a professor of computer music at Stony Brook University—play as the user performs various actions.

Full article here: https://www.bnl.gov/newsroom/news.php?a=214479

 

DMA Student Gvantsa Zangaladze Wins International Cochran Piano Competition

Gvantsa ZangaladzeThe Georgian pianist Gvantsa Zangaladze has won the 2019 edition of the International Cochran Piano Competition – the first online piano competition for adults which focuses on innovation, technology, and comprehensive long-term artistic development, created in 2014. She has also received the Special Prize for the best interpretation of Julian Cochran’s works.

The Georgian-born pianist, Gvantsa Zangaladze, graduated from Tbilisi State Conservatory where she studied under Svetlana Korsantia. She was one the few Georgian students to win the Presidential Master’s Program that supported her studies at Mannes College of Music in New York City, where she received her master’s degree in the studio of Eteri Andjaparidze.

Her main achievements include 3rd prize at the Heida Hermanns International Piano Competition in 2016 and the final round of the Washington International Piano Competition in 2014. She performs both as a solo pianist and a chamber musician. Her recent performances took place at such renowned locations as the Kennedy Center of Performing Arts, Tishman Auditorium at the New School, or Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall.

Stony Brook Alum Jeffery Meyer Wins American Prize in Orchestral Programming

The American Prize in Orchestral Programming / Vytautas Marijosius Memorial Award—college/university division

Winner:
Jeffery Meyer
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Tempe AZ

An accomplished conductor, pianist, and educator, Jeffery Meyer launched his career as a champion of contemporary orchestral music and innovative collaborations. He currently holds positions as Director of Orchestras at Arizona State University and as the Artistic Director of the St. Petersburg Chamber Philharmonic. In recent concert seasons, he has performed as a chamber musician and conductor throughout North America, Europe, China, Russia, and Southeast Asia.

In 2010, he led the St. Petersburg Chamber Philharmonic in its United States debut with three performances at Symphony Space’s “Wall-to-Wall” Festival in New York City which the New York Times called “impressive”, “powerful”, “splendid”, and “blazing.” His programming in the United States has been recognized with three ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming. He was a prizewinner in the 2008 International Conducting Competition “Antonio Pedrotti” and the winner of the 2013 American Prize in Conducting.

https://theamericanprize.blogspot.com/2019/07/winners-conductors-orchestral.html?fbclid=IwAR3h_5kKoJ5b251azy_L__V4Ih6iB9h1GQAgfaIPaCkgACiJ14iVxVW_qRk

Celebrating the Life and Career of Elaine Bonazzi

An event celebrating the life and career of soprano Elaine Bonazzi will take place on Sunday, April 14 at 7:30 in the National Opera Center of Opera America (7th floor) at 330 Seventh Avenue (between 28th and 29th streets).  A short film featuring Elaine will be shown and several speakers and singers will pay tribute to her.  A reception will follow and admission is free.
Elaine was a member of the Department of Music faculty from 1987 to 2012 and contributed to the high standards, professionalism, and warmth of the department.  All members of the department are welcome to attend.

Stony Brook Composition Student Wins Fulbright Scholarship

Congratulations to Eric Lemmon, Stony Brook Ph.D. composition student, on being awarded a Fulbright Scholarship. In Eric’s own words:

“The Fulbright will be conducted at the Züricher Hochschule der Künste in Zürich, Switzerland. While there I will be developing a participatory algorithmic computer music system that explores the politics of audience participation under Patrick Müller and Martin Neukom as my Ph.D. thesis work. I will be working at both the Institute for Computer Music and Sound Technology and collaborating with faculty and students in the Transdisciplinary Program.”

 

Stony Brook to Host Sound and Secularity Symposium

“Sound and Secularity” is a day-long symposium at Stony Brook University on April 12, 2019 that will engage what it means to speak, sing, and listen when secularism falters as the dominant frame for modern religious and political life. Scholars from several disciplines—anthropology, music, history, and religion—will join Stony Brook faculty to discuss how secularity and religious faith shape conceptions of sound and the meanings we attach to them.

  • WHEN: April 12, 10 am to 6 pm (registration at 9, full schedule on the website)
  • WHERE: Humanities Institute 1008
  • WHO: Visiting Scholars in Music, Religion, History, and Anthropology; Stony Brook Faculty from Music, History, and WGSS.
For more information and to register, please visit the “Sound and Secularity” website: you.stonybrook.edu/soundsecularity

Music Students Win Graduate Student Awards

DMA Candidate Ju Hyeon Han won the President’s Award to Distinguished Doctoral Students,  and will present a synopsis of their research (geared to a non-specialist audience) at a symposium held in conjunction with the Graduate Awards Ceremony. One of the winners will be asked to give a commencement speech at the Doctoral Hooding Ceremony.

Ph.D. Candidate Matt Brounley won the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student, and will be invited to participate in the August 2019 Workshop for New Teaching Assistants, presented each year to new doctoral students during graduate orientation events.

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