Category: Musicology

Professor Margarethe Adams Publishes New Book About Postsocialist Music in Kazakhstan

adamsSteppe Dreams: Time, Mediation, and Postsocialist Celebrations in Kazakhstan, Central Eurasia in Context, University of Pittsburgh Press, June 16, 2020.  Amazon link.

Steppe Dreams concerns the political significance of temporality in Kazakhstan, as manifested in public events and performances, and its reverberating effects in the personal lives of Kazakhstanis. Like many holidays in the post-Soviet sphere, public celebrations in Kazakhstan often reflect multiple temporal framings—utopian visions of the future, or romanticized views of the past—which throw light on present-day politics of identity. Adams examines the political, public aspects of temporality and the personal and emotional aspects of these events, providing a view into how time, mighty and unstoppable, is experienced in Kazakhstan.

Reviews
“This book engagingly describes how time and space, sound and belief, celebration and memory are negotiated by contemporary Kazakhstani citizens. It is a beautifully written work of cultural studies that provides both an overview for the novice and new insights for the expert.”—Laura Adams, Harvard University

“In vigorous and accessible language, Steppe Dreams deftly illuminates post-Soviet Kazakhstan’s ubiquitous culture of public festivity, celebration, and pilgrimage as a window into the construction of Kazakhstani nationhood. Margarethe Adams is an insightful ethnographer and graceful writer whose broad knowledge of life in Kazakhstan comes alive on every page.”—Theodore Levin, Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music, Dartmouth College

“Margarethe Adams shows us that the Soviet past is never past, that time lingers in pools of memory, structures, habits, celebrations, the arts and politics. The legacies of a transformative empire endure even in the visions of an alternative future in what seems a precarious and unending pursuit of an elusive happiness. Based on extensive fieldwork in Kazakhstan, Adams explores the nationalizing processes in the independent post-Soviet republic — the revival of Kazakh folk music, the calendar of holidays new and old – as well as the stubborn ideological reminders of the Soviet era. This is a masterwork of thick description of complex cultures in flux that speaks to larger theoretical issues of temporality, memory, and the affective affiliations to nation.”—Ronald Grigor Suny, The University of Michigan

About the Author
Margarethe Adams, assistant professor at Stony Brook University, is an ethnomusicologist specializing in music and popular culture in Central Asia. She has conducted ethnographic research in Kazakhstan, northwest China, and Mongolia, and has published in Collaborative Anthropologies and The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Music and Culture. Her work investigates temporality and politics in postsocialist culture, and her current research examines popular forms of religion and spirituality, including Muslim pilgrimage, religious healing, and Korean evangelical practices in Kazakhstan.

Stony Brook Alumna, Student, Featured in Journal of Network Music and Arts

Sarah Weaver NowNet Arts Festival 2018-Eric Vitale Photography-57.jpg

Dr. Sarah Weaver

The brand new Journal of Network Music and Arts recently published its first issue. Dr. Sarah Weaver (PH.D, 2018) serves as the editor-in-chief. Dr. Weaver describes the new journal in her editorial: “JONMA is a peer-reviewed open access digital research journal published by Stony Brook University. Network Music and Arts utilize the Internet and related technologies as an artistic medium for works created for this platform. JONMA will publish research by artists, technologists, educators, and related scholars. The journal content will include articles, audio and video documentation, and reviews for books and recordings.”

Eric Lemmon, Ph.D. student in Composition, has his article featured entitled “Telematic Music vs. Networked Music: Distinguishing Between Cybernetic Aspirations and Technological Music-Making.”

Employment Opportunity: Tenure-Track Scholar in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology

Scholar in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology

POSITION TITLE: Assistant Professor of Music (tenure-track)

QUALIFICATIONS: Scholar with an established record of, or demonstrated potential for, scholarly productivity. We have a particular interest in applicants whose research specialties intersect with one or more these areas: new approaches to music before 1600; gender, sexuality, and queer theory; critical race studies; or popular music studies. Candidates should hold a Ph.D, or have advanced ABD status, in Music History, Theory, or Ethnomusicology, and should be well-versed in both historical and theoretical domains. We look for demonstrated achievement in or potential for scholarly productivity, and a record of successful teaching experience.

EMPLOYMENT: Appointment starts late August 2020.

RANK: Assistant Professor (tenure-track). PhD required for appointment as Assistant; ABDs may be considered for lectureship.

DUTIES: Responsibilities will include undergraduate and graduate instruction, supervision of student research and writing, dissertation direction, advising, and departmental and university service.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Review of files begins October 1, 2019, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Applicants should complete the Academic Jobs Online application at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14419. Electronic submission of materials is required. The application requires these materials: cover letter, CV, statement of teaching interests and philosophy, and three letters of recommendation.

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS FROM WOMEN, PEOPLE OF COLOR, DISABLED PERSONS, AND/OR SPECIAL DISABLED OR VIETNAM ERA VETERANS ARE ESPECIALLY WELCOME.

Stony Brook to Host Sound and Secularity Symposium

“Sound and Secularity” is a day-long symposium at Stony Brook University on April 12, 2019 that will engage what it means to speak, sing, and listen when secularism falters as the dominant frame for modern religious and political life. Scholars from several disciplines—anthropology, music, history, and religion—will join Stony Brook faculty to discuss how secularity and religious faith shape conceptions of sound and the meanings we attach to them.

  • WHEN: April 12, 10 am to 6 pm (registration at 9, full schedule on the website)
  • WHERE: Humanities Institute 1008
  • WHO: Visiting Scholars in Music, Religion, History, and Anthropology; Stony Brook Faculty from Music, History, and WGSS.
For more information and to register, please visit the “Sound and Secularity” website: you.stonybrook.edu/soundsecularity
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