Project abstract: Sponge Reattachment on Different Substrates

Allegra_sarah_s_coral sponge

Allegra
Waters and Sarah
Song

Abstract

Sponges
are vital to the marine system because they can attach and grow on
just about anything allowing for niche specialization among
organisms. The objective of this study was to observe the
reattachment rates of different species of sponges on different
substrates.
Amphimedon
compressa, Aplysina fistularis
,
and
Iotrochota birotulata
were all placed on rock, sand, coral, and garbage. Each species was
cut up into three different sizes; 1cm, 5cm, 10cm. The attachment
rate depending on size was also tested. Each sponge was gently poked
after given 48 hours to attach. This process was repeated for 6 days
giving the sponge’s ample time to attach. The 10cm fragments
attached best in all three species of sponge.
A.
fistularis
had the overall
best attachment but
I.
birotulata
had the most
attach first. This data means
I.
birotulata
would be the
most successful in the ocean. Because of the constant disturbance of
wave action the shorter the time the sponge takes to attach the more
successful it would be in a real life situation.

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