Invite a marine organism at home

On Saturday 19th of August, LIA visitors had the opportunity to discover and observe local seaweeds, invertebrates and little fish they can use to build their own pet zoo.  They received tons of advice from the Abrams’ team. Excitement and fun guaranteed! Thanks to Stephen Abrams, Laura Bonilla and Jacob Murphy.

Build an Underwater Zoo

August 19, 2017

Meet with Steve Abrams, a local scientist and aquarist, and learn how to build and maintain your own underwater zoo using amazing local invertebrate creatures such as crab, shrimp, snail, anemone, cray fish, and insects. Come and discover more about marine and fresh water life on Long Island.

 

Hermit Crab at the Vancouver Aquarium

Ocean Engineering

Saturday July 15th, 2017

So much fun learning Oceanography with Tom and Helen Wilson and Chris Crosby.

Another wonderful day at the Long island Aquarium!

No bones about them: Long Island Invertebrates

June 17, 2017 @ 1PM – Build an Underwater Zoo

Meet with local scientist Steve Abrams and learn how to build and maintain your own underwater zoo using amazing local invertebrate creatures such as crab, shrimp, snail, anemone, cray fish, and insects. Come and discover more about marine and fresh water life on Long Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit: http://www.aquariumcreationsonline.net/crabs.html

Little bugs

Pr. Jackie Collier and Ph.D.  student Mariana Ruis presenting their research on labyrinthulomycetes  to visitors on Saturday 20th of May.  Children and their family had the opportunity to observe microorganisms using microscopes and to learn about tiny strange creatures that live in the ocean.

Microorganisms

May 20, 2017 @ 1PM – Microorganisms. 

Friend or Foe? Why some odd organisms with strange names matter to you! Meet with Pr. Jackie Collier from Stony Brook University as she will present a strange group of microscopic organisms you’ve probably never heard of, and likely to affect your life in some way….  the fascinating labyrinthulomycetes. These organisms are known to cause devastating marine diseases, while others are used to supplement aquaculture feed and even baby formula with essential fatty acids; all are a fundamental part of marine ecosystems.

SoMAS Professor Dr. Jackie Collier                            Image result for labyrinthulomycetes

Professor Jackie Collier and Labyrinthulomycetes.
Photo Credit: Enixy Collado Mercado,
Stony Brook University

“it’s the first time in my life I have seen plankton” said an amazed senior visitor.

It’s never too late to learn! Another wonderful time at the LIA with Dr. Theresa Hatterath-Lehmann and several members from the Gobler’s lab (Jennifer Goleski,  Dr Yoonja Kang, Megan Ladds and Benjamin Kramer). Visitors discovered with stupefaction how a droplet of seawater can be rich in living organisms. 

Life in a drop of water

April 22, 2017 at 1pm

Phytoplankton are microscopic plant-like organisms that drift in the oceans. Phytoplankton convert the sun’s energy into food, are the base of the marine food web and are therefore considered some of the most important organisms on the planet.  Come join members of the Gobler Lab, and most specifically Dr. Theresa Hatterath-Lehmannin exploring phytoplankton and their predators from Long Island waters!

Multi-system Sampling

Photo courtesy of T. Hattenrath-Lehmann

For more information, visit the Gobler lab and click on Welcome!

Welcome!

 

Are you 1, are you 2?

Can you tell how old is a clam? This week end at LIA, visitors helped Bob Cerrato aging shells! Can you believe one shell was 50 years old? Children and their family crafted their own clam with Bob and Norah’s help.

Can you tell how old is a clam?

Meet with Professor Robert Cerrato from StonyBrook University and learn how clams grow, what influences growth and why it is important to determine their age.

Picture available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Shell_Island_1985.jpg

Robert M. Cerrato

 

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