Matus Lab

Evolutionary, Cell and Developmental Biological Approaches to Understanding Morphogenesis


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Research

Research

How are cells programmed to execute the complicated behaviors required to pattern tissues, form organs and facilitate cell dispersal during development and disease states? The study of morphogenesis requires an integrative understanding at multiple scales from single molecule to organismal and input from many research methodologies. We are broadly interested in trying to understand how morphogenetic events are programmed during development, how these processes evolve between species and how they might go awry during pathogenic events such as cancer. We are using nematode uterine-vulval attachment as a model to understand how a cell acquires the ability to breach the basement membrane, an ancient form of extracellular matrix unique to the animal kingdom. Specifically, we are interested in the relationship between cell cycle regulation and the ability to breach, expand and stabilize a basement membrane breach. We use a combination of evolutionary, cell biological and developmental approaches to investigate nematode uterine-vulval attachment. We examine morphogenetic events at single-cell resolution using spinning disc microscopy in the model nematode C. elegans and are excited...

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Introduction

Introduction

  The Matus lab is interested in understanding how cells execute morphogenetic behaviors during development and how these behaviors evolve between species. We use the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and other rhabditid nematodes to examine uterine-vulval attachment during larval development. If you’re in the area, feel free to pay us a visit in the Life Sciences Building in the Biochemistry and Cell Biology Department at Stony Brook University.  We are currently hoping to recruit a post-doctoral researcher and interested potential graduate students and post-docs should send us an...

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