Comcast’s Prepares For Battle

By Nicole Sims The $45.2 billion takeover of Time Warner Cable is seeming more like an uphill, but still winnable battle for Comcast. When it comes to competition in the industry, Comcast has already agreed to sell three of the 12 million Time Warner subscribers they stand to gain, but by law they aren’t required to. However, instead of selling these subscribers to another media company to even the playing field, Comcast has recently considered pacing those 3 million subscribers into a spinoff company. A customer base of that magnitude will automatically place this proposed company among the ranks of the top cable companies in the industry, which is already toppled by Comcast. Despite the fact that this would do little to promote competition among cable providers, the FCC has never established a regulatory gap for the number of subscribers a cable company can have. This fact is a contributing factor of why Comcast has continued to expand and conquer over the past five decades, and has never had a single deal rejected by the FCC. The lack of government regulation regarding subscribers is not Comcast’s only advantage when it comes to making this deal happen. Time Warner’s top executives have a $135 million incentive to make sure this deal is approved by March 12 of next year. Time Warner calls the payoff the “Golden Parachute Compensation,” in which Comcast has offered Time Warner’s top four executives money to step down if the deal is successful. Time Warner’s CEO Robert Marcus could possibly receive $80 million alone, making his payout the largest “golden parachute” award since 2011. When it comes to making deals, Comcast is a steady force to be reckoned with. This deal is far from being accepted, but Comcast may have an advantage from the lack of the FCC’s regulation, and support of Time Warner executives. Those are some pretty powerful allies....

BuzzFeed: Perfecting The Art Of Attracting Views

By Nicole Sims It may be easy for some to pass off BuzzFeed as a site that specializes in funny top 10 lists, but this is a company that’s taking all those laughs to the bank. The company predicts it will make more than 120 million dollars in revenue by the end of 2014. BuzzFeed’s founder, Jonah Peretti, has succeeded in providing free content to readers while still making his company profitable. So what’s the secret to his success? The answer is found in these two simple words: building traffic. It’s pretty hard to find a trustworthy site that has headlines like “The 29 most Important Twerking Moments Of 2013,” while having the most recent information on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight. BuzzFeed provides premium content that’s free for all to read because of how easy it is to share these stories among our social network friends. In an interview with Fortune, Peretti describes the business model best by saying “BuzzFeed [is a] platform that enables us to understand how people are sharing and distributing things like entertainment content, journalism, [and] branded content…on this platform that we built.” In the past year, the site’s traffic that has nearly quadrupled, and since first being founded in 2006, has peaked at 130 million unique site visits in one month. According to the media sharing tracker Scanvine,  BuzzFeed’s 2013 sharing figures places it in competition with top news sites like The New York Times and BBC News. Advertiser’s have taken notice. At first glance, a reader may be surprised that there isn’t an obnoxious amount to advertisements plastered all over the page. Look again. BuzzFeed uniquely incorporates it’s use of lists and pictures into sponsored ads that are posted on the site like regular content that isn’t distracting, or overwhelming for readers. So far Peretti’s vision has landed the company in liquid gold, and based off it’s rapid success, a 120 million dollar profit isn’t an...

Digital Media: Who Comes Out Ahead?

By Nicole Sims  The younger generation is the driving force behind the digital age. Digital technology, like computer and cellphones, have basically been embedded in the culture of people aged 18-29. Most kids today grow up learning how to operate these technologies. According to a study done by the Pew Research Center,  71 percent of young adults say the internet is their main source of news. Right behind them are people aged 30-49, and 63 percent admit to the same thing. Although television news remains the number on source for news, it has been on a slow decline over the past decade. This means that the future of the news business is dependent on keeping the attention a younger audience.This includes adapting to their changing opinions. In 2009, Time Magazine published an article titled “The 10 most Endangered Newspapers in America.” This list predicted 10 publications around the country that would either fold, or no longer be in print form if they chose not to go digital on the internet. News companies must recognize that less people are willing to pay for news when it can be accessed for free online. The publications that are smart will learn to use the internet as a tool, not a roadblock. In a letter address to readers, publisher Terry Egger and editor Adams Simmons  of the Cleveland Pain Dealer recognized “the way people can and want to receive news and information is changing rapidly.”  They have addressed this issue by hiring a “digitally-focused company,” called the the Northeast Ohio Media Group to become more digitally friendly. Even though the internet was at one point not perceived as a threat to the news business, its impact has been devastating. The print industry of news can no longer blame ignorance as an excuse for not adapting. For those that do, going bankrupt or closing altogether are their only...

Skip to toolbar