Category Archives: Lecture Capturing

Editing ASR Transcripts from Echo360

If you asked for Automatic Speech Recognition to be turned on in echo360 for your course, you also agreed to edit them.  Here is some feedback from Dr. John True on the process that he used to edit them.  Feel free to comment to share your methods.

(1) download raw transcript file from Echo content as instructed by Echo360.org
(2) edit carefully in text editor, replacing only transcript text and keeping all carriage returns and blank lines
(3) save as .vtt by changing the suffix to .vtt in finder
(4) check format at https://quuz.org/webvtt/
This will produce a list of errors by line number. Paste entire text into MSWord and turn on line numbering using Line Numbers in Layout tab (ms Word for Mac 2019) to see the line numbering of the file. The line numbers will not be precise; they will be one or two lines off but this should be close enough to find the errors. My first file had three & symbols, which are not allowed and one deleted line break.  & symbols will be listed as incorrect escapes and deleted line breaks (timing cue abuts transcript text when this happens) will be listed as “Milliseconds must be given in three digits.”.
(5) make the changes in .vtt file in text editor and save (should keep the .vtt format)
(6) upload edited .vtt file in both transcript and caption areas as instructed by Echo360.org
(7) turn on closed captioning for video to see the captions

ASR for Live Presentations in Google Slides & MS PowerPoint

This is super easy.   But a caveat… we have a BIG feature request for Google and MS regarding this technology.

So here is a recording I made using QuickTime Player on a Mac, of myself giving a test presentation in Google Slides.  You will notice that there is no audio.  I think that I don’t have the audio setup right for QT, but in a way it illustrates the power of this ASR.  Technical problems happen while we are teaching.  It does happen.  In this case, because I was using ASR in Google Slides, you can still receive my presentation through sight.

Hover over the video and click on the icon with the box and arrow, to make the video larger, so you can read the live captions.

Next I try the same basic idea in MS Power Point.  It is slightly more complicated to activate, but still not an overwhelming obstacle.  I also fixed my QuickTime Player audio for this recording. MS uses their own “intelligent services” for the captioning, whereas Google used the Macs built in speech recognition.

 

Now for the Caveat.  When you are finished, the captions aren’t saved.  If I hadn’t done screen recordings, I wouldn’t even have this much.  So you can’t use them for individuals who would have been employing a screen reader, and you can’t use this to jump start your production of a transcript.  This is only for producing captions during a live talk and only useful for sighted individuals.

If you are interested in using ASR for successfully making your course recordings accessible and even fully ADA compliant, please look into turning on ASR within echo360.org by using this form.

This is a cross post from you.stonybrook.edu/jadams